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2 edition of effect of age on transpiration rates of Douglas-fir seedlings (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) found in the catalog.

effect of age on transpiration rates of Douglas-fir seedlings (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco)

Rollin R. Geppert

effect of age on transpiration rates of Douglas-fir seedlings (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco)

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir.,
  • Plants -- Transpiration.,
  • Plants -- Drought tolerance.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Rollin R. Geppert.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[8], 48 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages48
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14257083M

      The fact that transpiration is significantly less affected by g m than A n is because first, g m effects on g s, and thus transpiration, are only indirect via the effects of g m on A n, second, because a small fraction of stomatal conductance (the g 0 parameter representing the residual g s) is unaffected by changes in A n, and third, because. Progress 01/01/92 to 12/30/92 Outputs DORMANCY - Completed study to determine effects of water stress on dormancy initiation, carbohydrate reserves and nutrient contents of container grown Douglas-fir seedlings. A moderate moisture regime was found to generate the best phenological, morphological, and physiological seedling development.   Plants also play a significant role in the environment by influencing climate and producing life-giving oxygen. Plant project studies allow us to learn about plant biology and potential usage for plants in other fields such as medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology.


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effect of age on transpiration rates of Douglas-fir seedlings (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) by Rollin R. Geppert Download PDF EPUB FB2

Seedlings of Douglas‐fir from seed of a number of mesic and xeric origins were grown in growth chambers and a nursery to various ages up to 16 weeks.

Measurements were made to determine the effect of seedling age, growth chamber and nursery pre‐conditioning, and seed source on transpiration rates under closely controlled laboratory by: In this study transpiration rates were measured on Douglas-fir seedlings from five seed sources.

The seedlings were grown under two environments, a growth chamber and outside in cold frames. Transpiration was measured at two ages, 4 and 16 weeks. Comparison of transpiration rates was made at low soil moisture : Wolfhard Friedrich Ruetz.

Seedlings of Douglas‐fir from seed of a number of mesic and xeric origins were grown in growth chambers and a nursery to various ages up to 16 weeks. Measurements were made to determine the effect Cited by: Graduation date: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age\ud on rates of transpiration by Douglas-fir seedlings.

Weekly average transpiration rates of yr-old Douglas fir trees in a thinned stand during sunny weather in July ranged from L∙tree −1 ∙d −1 when θ e the fraction of extractable soil water remaining in the root zone, was to L∙tree −1 ∙d −1 when θ e was The transpiration rate of trees in the thinned stand Cited by: P.

UNTERSCHEUTZ, W. RUETZ, R. GEPPERT, W. FERRELL The Effect of Age, Pre-conditioning, and Water Stress on the Transpiration Rates of Douglas-Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) Seedlings of Several Ecotypes, Physiologia Planta no.3 3 (Nov ): –Cited by:   At short-term variation in irradiance, transpiration rate increased with increased PPFD, and decreased with increase in seedling age.

At 15 weeks, transpiration rate decreased with increased previous long-term PPFD level. D.T. Price, T.A. Black, Effects of summertime changes in weather and root-zone soil water storage on canopy CO2 flux and evapotranspiration of two juvenile Douglas-fir stands, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, /(91)V, 53, 4, (), ().

Transpiration, the loss of water vapor from plants, is a physical process that is under control of both external physical and physiological radiation provides the energy source for transpiration. In general, the rate of transpiration is proportional to the gradient in water vapor concentration between sources of water within the plant and the bulk atmosphere and the total.

The cuticle, being made of wax, has a limiting effect on the transpiration rate by hampering the diffusion of water vapor to the outside atmosphere.

Sunken stomata, as in adelfa or Nerium oleander, also lessen the rate of transpiration by sheltering the boundary layer from wind movement. The rate of transpiration depends upon the rate of absorption of soil water by roots. This is further influenced by a number of soil factors like soil water, soil particles, soil temperature, soil air etc.

The rate of transpiration increases with the increase in the availability of water in the soil. In a pot trial growth and transpiration of 3-year-old Douglas-fir seedlings on an acid, sandy soil was examined at a deficient (30 kg N ha-1 year-1) and an excessive level ( kg N ha-1 year-1 of NH4 application.

Dissolved ammonium sulphate was applied to the pots weekly for two growing seasons. In half of the pots a complete set of other nutrients was applied in optimal proportions to the. The partial pressure of CO 2 has been shown to affect transpiration, N allocation, and photosynthetic rate of Douglas-fir seedlings and saplings in a series of studies utilizing sunlit.

The effect of plant and leaf age on CO 2-exchange rates (CER) and transpiration rates in 15 genotypes of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) was measured in situ by infrared gas analysis. The plants were grown in a controlled-environment room with a h photoperiod, day–night temperatures of 29–24 °C, and 60–70% relative age had no effect on leaf CER, whereas.

Graduation date: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age\ud on rates of transpiration by Douglas-fir seedlings. Seeds were\ud collected from a xeric site (Goldendale, Washington) and a mesic\ud site (Forks, Washington). Effects of leaf age and tree size on stomatal and mesophyll limitations to photosynthesis in mountain beech (year-old) and tall (year-old) trees.

Rates of photosynthesis, A n, at saturating irradiance ( μmol m −2 s −1) and ambient CO 2 partial and effects on transpiration efficiency and carbon isotope discrimination.

Net photosynthesis, transpiration, and stomatal and residual conductances for current-year shoots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) were measured in an open gas exchange system. that affect the rates of plant transpiration and evaporation from the soil surface.

We evaluated the effects of vegetation control and organic matter (OM) removal on SWC in a Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation from age 3 through 5. The study area was a highly productive site in the Coast Range of. The pH of xylem sap from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants increased from pH to as the soil dried.

Detached wild-type but not flacca leaves exhibited reduced transpiration rates when the artificial xylem sap (AS) pH was increased.

When a well-watered concentration of abscisic acid ( μm) was provided in the AS, the wild-type transpirational response to pH was restored to. Zavitkovski, J. and Ferrell, W. K., Effect of drought upon rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration of seedlings of two ecotypes of Douglas-fir.

The effect of drought on the rate of photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration in two ecotypes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) Public Deposited.

Analytics and also between the Valsetz and N. Washington seedlings at two and three months of age. These ratios decreased in both sources between the ages of two and. Douglas-fir seedlings from western Montana and western Oregon seed sources were grown in a cool (18°C day-4°C night) or warm (36°C day oc night) growth chamber.

Photosynthetic and respiratory rates were measured at 20°, °, and 35°C at cotyledon stage. Age of Plants: Germinating seeds generally show a slow rate of transpiration. It increases with age and becomes maximum at maturity. But rate of transpiration decreases during senescence.

-transpirants are the chemical substances that are used to reduce the rate of transpiration without causing any adverse effect on their growth and other. F.A. 31 No. ] Two-year seedlings were grown in screened washed river sand with a field capacity of % ( atm.

soil moisture stress (SMS) and permanent wilting point of % (15 atm. SMS). As in the 2- and 3-month seedlings tested earlier, rates of photosynthesis were higher in plants from mesic sites (a) than in those from xeric sites (b) at SMS between 1 and 15 atm.

and reached. By analyzing the seasonal changes in the photosynthesis (CO₂ uptake and fixation) and transpiration (water loss) rates of evergreen and deciduous trees, we can determine which trees should be promoted for future plantation projects, to develop a greener and more sustainable future.

Trees exhibiting higher photosynthesis rates under various environmental conditions and growing seasons could. age (ring number from the pith), in year-old Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesiivar. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] trees.

Using a new method, we measureks on samples excised from different heights and radial positions within the stem. We then compare within-stem patterns ofks with aspects of xylem anatomy known to be a function of cambial age.

Red tree voles may also be found in immature forests if Douglas-fir is a significant component. The red vole nests almost exclusively in the foliage of the trees, typically 2–50 metres (5– ft) above the ground, and its diet consists chiefly of Douglas-fir needles.

Douglas fir seeds provide food for a number of small mammals, including chipmunks, mice, shrews, and red squirrels. Bears eat the sap of these trees.

Bears eat the sap of these trees. Many songbirds eat the seeds right out of the cone, and raptors, like northern spotted.

To examine effects of heat waves on physiology and growth of Douglas-fir, seedlings were grown under high temperature (control +10°C) combined with high vapour pressure deficit (control + kPa) as well as under control conditions (20°C and kPa) for more than three months ().The heat wave showed whole July temperature anomalies (compared to ) of up to +10°C for large areas of.

Interestingly, those plants with reduced density and larger stomata also showed reduced transpiration, greater growth rates, and a larger biomass (Doheny-Adams et al., ). The authors ascribed the improved growth rate to a combination of improved water status, higher metabolic temperatures, and lower metabolic costs associated with the.

These factors will increase the rate of evaporation from open bodies of water and from the soil surface, if soil moisture is available. During a drought, transpiration by plants may decrease, as plants attempt to conserve water.

The magnitude of the decrease in transpiration depends on the plant's. ThepCO 2 has been shown to affect transpiration, N allocation, and photosynthetic rate of Douglas-fir seedlings and saplings in a series of studies utilizing sunlit, environmentally controlled growth chambers (Lewis et al.; Tingey et al.

Resistance to water uptake in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) and coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii) seedlings was studied in a controlled environment using an Ohm's Law analogy to liquid phase water flow for calculating resistance from measurements of soil and needle water potential and, uptake rate.

This study compares resistance in ponderosa. development an increased transpiration stress was causing seedling and stand mortality.

To develop adventitious roots the seedlings require a period during which the soil surface will continuously remain moist for 2 to 4 days. This moisture requirement is caused by the growth form of blue grama seedlings (Hyder) that elevates the. Abstract. Two major components of climate change, increasing atmospheric [CO 2] and increasing temperature, may substantially alter the effects of water availability to plants through effects on the rate of water loss from examined the interactive effects of elevated [CO 2] and temperature on seasonal patterns of stomatal conductance (g s), transpiration (E) and instantaneous.

Water might become more available with age if the roots of larger trees can tap deeper water sources, allowing them to have higher rates of transpiration and photosynthesis than smaller trees27, This could explain many of the studies in Table 2 that show increased photosynthesis with age.

The questions hinged on whether trees vary in their capacity for water interception and transpiration. To get answers, loggers clear-cut mature hardwood forests of native oak and hickory in two watersheds in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, then replanted them with white pine seedlings.

Effects of low concentrations of O3, leaf age and water stress on leaf diffusive conductance and water use efficiency in soybean. Physiologia Plantarum63 (1), We found a significant (P = ) effect of plant growth stage on the difference between photosynthesis and transpiration rate thresholds and, a significant (P = ) effect of leaf age on transpiration.

Such results will improve phenotyping methods and provide paths for. Additionally, trees grown on ‘G’ rootstock received applications of plant growth regulators (PGR) in a spray over the leaves, and as a latex paint application directly on the graft union.

PGR treated trees were tested for changes in growth and graft union strength. Transpiration rate and. (a) Effects of age on sap flux density (kg m-2 day-1) in the young (thin black line, mean of 7 trees) and old (-thick black line, mean of 3 trees) P.

menziesii from early June until late October. This dyed celery experiment is a classic science demonstration that shows how plants use transpiration to suck up water. We really enjoyed this white carnation experiment a couple of years back and decided to repeat the same idea, this time using celery for comparison.The water in your straw may only go up a little bit on its own but in plants, the water can move hundreds of feet based on the effects of transpiration and cohesion.

Lesson Summary.J. D. Lewis, M. Lucash, D. M. Olszyk, D. T. Tingey Stomatal responses of Douglas-fir seedlings to elevated carbon dioxide and temperature during the third and fourth years of exposure, Plant, Cell and Environm no 11 (Nov ):